Month: October 2017

(中文) 手腕和手指前臂對齊動作 Part I

Sorry, this entry is only available in 中文.

大家要繼續加油! (正面思想和創意新方法思維)

Just wanna make a video to cheer you students and teachers up in Cantonese :) Your mind comes first – success is achieved when you think you CAN!! 正面思想好緊要嫁! 而且揾新方法了解同練習才可以有進步! 大家加油啦!

Our new music service: connect students and teachers

We now provide teachers all over the world to suit your needs, whether you want to take lessons in real time at the same place with your teacher, or via online platform – still in real time but in two different places.

We offer lessons in all kinds of music genre, from classical to pop, rock to jazz, bluegrass to songwriting, with a wide variety of musical instruments from piano to violin, percussion to singing, and even composing and conducting. We also can help you with audition, exam, performance and competition preparation. Whatever your goal is we help you achieve it, together.

We have been having great results connecting students to their new teachers recently. I am sure this is the beginning of a wonderful music journey for both parties (and the parents too!). If you are interested in finding a new (or first!) teacher or new students, join our community now! Our team is waiting to bring you closer to your goals, much faster than you would ever imagined! Our teachers can teach you in person or online, in many areas of music making and performing.

We can also help piano teachers achieve their goals of establishing their studios and improving their teaching skills!

Let us know what you need and we will help you achieve it!
– Teresa Wong & TWSOM TEAM

How to memorise a piece effectively

I get a lot of enquiries about playing by memory. Here are a few useful tips:

1. Mark out the sections and phrases
It’s important to know where a section / a phrase starts and ends – this practice is not only important for memorisation but also in practice and knowing the music more deeply and securely

2. Repeat in small doses
It’s a very useful tool to memorise a piece in small doses first especially if you are new to the practice. Start with one phrase and then two, gradually working up to a whole section. Then work on two sections and more eventually leading up to the whole movement/piece.

For example:
Repeat each phrase 5-10 times. Then two phrases 5-10 times. Then three phrases 5-10 times and so on.

It’s also great to try starting in the middle of a piece – a lot of times when performers have a slip of memory it’s never at the beginning of a piece or not even the beginning of a section/phrase. I encourage my students to start playing /memorising in the middle of the music to see if they can start and continue from there – I call them “safety stops”. It’s like taking a train: it starts and ends at big terminals, but it also travels through and pauses by many small stations / stops in between the whole journey to pick up and drop off passengers. So throughout the whole music journey (the music piece you are playing and memorising), you also need some musical stops to know where you are at currently. It helps you keep track of where you have been, where you are at, and where you are going, until the end.

For me I even memorised from the end back to the beginning just to test my memory of the piece. Most important of all, try to be creative about your memorisation process and think/practice outside of the box – remember, there is no one way to do it right for you, and often, those “weird” ways of doing one thing are THE ways to get you closer and faster towards your goal!

Until next time,

Teresa Wong