Category: Piano Clinic 鋼琴診所

About Online Consultation (Piano Diploma Exams)

Choices after grade 8 piano (instrumental) exam: Diplomas (ABRSM/TCL)

Words of Encouragement for You

I just want to write a quick note for all of you out there, who might be feeling a bit down or frustrated because you didn’t have the better result than you expected in your exam/concert/teaching/building your studio. Please read this:

You didn’t fail.
You tried your best (at that moment) and it wasn’t the result you wanted. (If you didn’t try your best then thats really your fault and you have no one to blame it for.)
You can try again.
But before you take that exam/performance/the next project, think about what went wrong.
Looking into yourself is very important, but most people don’t want to do it. Because it’s hard. It can be embarrassing to see why you made that mistake.
But you are only human.
What you can do now is to think how to move forward and be better next time around. And to reach that goal you need a much better planning this time.
Because most likely, what didn’t work last time will not work next time either. And if you are just going to do the same thing again, you are simply setting yourself up for error and mistake one more time. Who does that? Some people do. You don’t want to be one of them.

Now, get up and tell yourself, you are setting up for success this time. And you are going to do your best you know how for it – this requires very careful and detailed planning and execution of what your plan is.
Stick with your plan is very important, second to having a great plan. But even if you have a great plan, if you don’t do what you plan to do, nothing will work for you, so remember that.

Great reward comes from great effort with persistence and time. Nothing substantial is achieved within a very short period of time. Teaching and playing is building knowledge, that’s very similar to building wealth, no one can do it in one day or even a year. It’s constant work and struggle. I have had my fair share of work and struggle. I get frustrated myself sometimes. But every time I get beat up by life and I get back up faster and faster. Because I know deep inside me there’s no point wasting more time on anything even slightly negative and unproductive, that is not contributing to my growth and success.

So here I encourage you to just step back, relax, take a deep breath, and get back up on your feet. I know you can do this and you have that power within you to make this work.

Stay motivated,
Teresa Wong

(中文) 手腕和手指前臂對齊動作 Part I

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Our new music service: connect students and teachers

We now provide teachers all over the world to suit your needs, whether you want to take lessons in real time at the same place with your teacher, or via online platform – still in real time but in two different places.

We offer lessons in all kinds of music genre, from classical to pop, rock to jazz, bluegrass to songwriting, with a wide variety of musical instruments from piano to violin, percussion to singing, and even composing and conducting. We also can help you with audition, exam, performance and competition preparation. Whatever your goal is we help you achieve it, together.

We have been having great results connecting students to their new teachers recently. I am sure this is the beginning of a wonderful music journey for both parties (and the parents too!). If you are interested in finding a new (or first!) teacher or new students, join our community now! Our team is waiting to bring you closer to your goals, much faster than you would ever imagined! Our teachers can teach you in person or online, in many areas of music making and performing.

We can also help piano teachers achieve their goals of establishing their studios and improving their teaching skills!

Let us know what you need and we will help you achieve it!
– Teresa Wong & TWSOM TEAM

How to memorise a piece effectively

I get a lot of enquiries about playing by memory. Here are a few useful tips:

1. Mark out the sections and phrases
It’s important to know where a section / a phrase starts and ends – this practice is not only important for memorisation but also in practice and knowing the music more deeply and securely

2. Repeat in small doses
It’s a very useful tool to memorise a piece in small doses first especially if you are new to the practice. Start with one phrase and then two, gradually working up to a whole section. Then work on two sections and more eventually leading up to the whole movement/piece.

For example:
Repeat each phrase 5-10 times. Then two phrases 5-10 times. Then three phrases 5-10 times and so on.

It’s also great to try starting in the middle of a piece – a lot of times when performers have a slip of memory it’s never at the beginning of a piece or not even the beginning of a section/phrase. I encourage my students to start playing /memorising in the middle of the music to see if they can start and continue from there – I call them “safety stops”. It’s like taking a train: it starts and ends at big terminals, but it also travels through and pauses by many small stations / stops in between the whole journey to pick up and drop off passengers. So throughout the whole music journey (the music piece you are playing and memorising), you also need some musical stops to know where you are at currently. It helps you keep track of where you have been, where you are at, and where you are going, until the end.

For me I even memorised from the end back to the beginning just to test my memory of the piece. Most important of all, try to be creative about your memorisation process and think/practice outside of the box – remember, there is no one way to do it right for you, and often, those “weird” ways of doing one thing are THE ways to get you closer and faster towards your goal!

Until next time,

Teresa Wong

(中文) 网上钢琴课程

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Short Online Courses for Piano Teachers/Diploma Students

We are now introducing new online courses and taking enrolment until the spaces are all filled.

Here are the courses and short description: 

Course 1. How to prepare your students for diploma exams successfully

Class 1:

General criteria of exam requirement and repertoire choice 

Class 2:

How to choose pieces for your students 

Class 3:

Examples of repertoire choice and general background of genre/pieces 

Class 4: 

Viva voce questions and preparation 

Class 5:

More on viva voce and programme notes 

Student project presentation: examples of repertoire choices and viva voce questions 

(Class 4/5 are subject to change if most of the teacher students are more inclined to prepare students for Trinity exams instead of ABRSM exams)

Course 2. How to improve your students’ technique 

Class 1:

Piano playing and body utilization 

Concept of Body weight and weight transfer 

Class 2:

Application of body weight and weight transfer 

Relation of body weight and weight transfer to arm/hand/finger movement 

Class 3:

More elaboration on class 2 concepts 

Weight training 

Piano techniques 

Class 4:

More on weight training and piano technique

Application and examples of different techniques

Class 5:

Student Project presentation: application of techniques with chosen music examples 

Course 3. How to analyze and interpret advanced repertoire

Class 1:

General background of musical periods

General development of piano/keyboard instruments

Class 2:

Main genres and their characteristics of keyboard repertoire (Baroque and Classical)

Music examples: form, structure and analysis

Class 3:

Main genres and their characteristics of keyboard repertoire (Classical and Romantic)

Music examples: form, structure and analysis

Class 4:

More on genres and examples of keyboard repertoire

More on background and analysis of keyboard repertoire

Performance practice of each musical period in relation to the development and repertoire of the keyboard instrument

How to analyze and prepare a piece for performance and exam

Class 5:

Student Project presentation: application of knowledge learnt in the course with chosen piece of your own

Total Course time

5 hours

Each class duration

1 hour in total: 45 minutes’ lecture + 15 minutes’ Q & A session 

Total fee per course

Original course fee: $3000

Special course fee for early bird enrolment:  $2500 

Deadline for early bird enrolment:  September 8, 2017

Deadline for all enrolment: September 20, 2017

Commencement of courses (Class 1):

Course 1: September 22 Friday 11am

Course 2: September 21 Thursday 10am

Course 3: September 21 Thursday 11am

Note: We might have more course times if there are more students than open spaces in any of the courses and if students are unavailable at the schedule given above. Contact us directly to request more schedule details.

Payment method:

Pay via PayPal or bank transfer to our HSBC account. (Details will be given after  your enrolment – 100% confirmation of your enrolment will be completed after we have received your payment)

We are also organizing a new course to train new teachers to teach Miss Wong’s piano technique method, so that you can train your students to become a more accomplished performer with avid interest in learning music and playing the piano with confidence, control and dexterity! Stay tuned for this course. 

(中文) 計劃你的鋼琴練習 (II)

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Plan Your Piano Practice Strategy

How to set up your music studio: Purpose of your teaching

How to build a successful music/piano studio (II)

 

 

 

How to build a successful music/piano studio?

A lot of readers asked me this question. I get it, it’s hard to promote yourself. It’s even embarrassing, because we are musicians/pianists, we are artists, we are not for sale. But hey, don’t think about it in that way. If you want people to know you, you have to get out there and literally tell people that YOU EXIST. So here are a few pointers as to how to promote yourself in order to build a successful and thriving music studio of yours:

1. Start a blog

Share with your existing and potential students what you’ve got: what you know about music, piano and teaching. Just write something short and simple at the beginning  few lines every day, about what you’ve learnt and taught in lessons or some tips on practice and playing. Eventually you can write more and add more substance in your posts. 

2. Record videos

Record videos of your students playing in lessons or even your own playing. Teach people some basic music theories, like how to read or identify chords. 

3. Write something about yourself

Write about your educational qualifications, your experience in performance and teaching. Tell people about your teaching philosophy and style: it’s important for your potential students (and especially their parents) to know about your personally. 

4. Share your experience

People want to connect with those whom they feel familiar with. If you share your experience with your readers, they already feel like they know you before they’ve even met you-and I know that from my personal experience. Be authentic and genuine. 

Learn more from the podcasts below:

 

How to perfect your scales (Part II)

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(中文) 網上在線鋼琴諮詢課堂 Online Piano consultation lessons

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