Tag: 聖三一鋼琴演奏文憑考試

Special Offer: Online Piano Consultation Sessions

To celebrate a special milestone with my lovely readers in my teaching and performing career, I am giving away a special promotion for all online consultation sessions, including:

piano diploma programs (dipABRSM piano, ATCL piano, LRSM piano, LTCL piano, dipABRSM piano teaching) –

repertoire advice,

performance improvement,

musical, technical and stylistic awareness,

quick study,

viva voce preparation,

programme notes writing (all instruments),

mock exams;

 

music college audition advice,

competition preparation,

college paper writing help;

 

piano teaching consultation-

ABRSM and TCL exams, and any general issues,

general teaching business consultation,

piano technique issues, music theory exams (grade 5 and grade 8),

music instruction book writing and publishing advice,

general performance improvement.

 

Anything music /piano-related topics!

 

When you sign up between now and end of October 2018,  you can enjoy this offer until December 2018.

How to choose a piano diploma exam program (I)

(中文) 貪心是可以的!如果你肯付出的話。

Sorry, this entry is only available in 中文.

How to Use the Piano Pedal (I)

Often students ask me how to use pedal(s) in a piece they are working on. To that I am quite surprised at first, but I understand where they are coming from. They were never taught about the real application of pedaling – just as they were never taught anything about piano technique.

Let’s focus on the right pedal, the so-called “loud” pedal. It’s the sustaining pedal which maintains the resonance of fuller sound produced by keeping the whole set of dampers lifted off the strings when being kept down.

First of all, we rarely step to the very bottom of the sustaining pedal. More often than not, we step half way or at most 3/4 way down of the depth of the pedal. What does that mean? 

Watch the video here (it’s in Cantonese for now, will make one in English soonest!)

Imagine you are driving. Once you start the car, you step on the gas pedal, you never really step all the way down because that would be you are going on a fast-and-furious speed you cannot control! It’s just the same as using a pedal at the piano. 

In the same theory, you never release the pedal all the way up too, just as you never fully release the gas pedal in order to keep the car going. At the piano, when you have to change the pedaling, you always release until just a bit of leeway before you feel you fully release the whole pedal all the way up. That means you still feel some pressure holding just a little bit of the pedal down.  You would of course however release the whole pedal all the way up when you have finished the whole pedaling process, or you are playing the next passage or chord that does not require pedaling, or the chords (e.g. Staccato  notes or short block chords) that require very clean separate sound instead of very legato and lyrical one. 

Other than pressing the sustaining pedal most of the way down, you can also press half way down, a third or a fourth of the way down, or something we called flutter pedal, which means you only press very little of the pedal and change it very quickly to keep very very clean yet connected sound with more resonance than otherwise. 

In the next post, I shall talk about when (the timing) to apply the sustaining pedal. 

The Importance of being Authentic

I hope I have always been true to my students and my readers here.

Frankly I think I have.

But there were certainly times i doubted if it was the way I was supposed to be, if I were being truly authentic, perhaps to myself more than to anyone else.

I didn’t want to be too straightforward or outspoken at times because people might not like what i write and i would be ridiculed and criticised for that. Or i simply didn’t write it.

I didn’t want to write in a too serious or philosophical or academic or deep, meaningful or spiritual way that people might not understand what I was trying to say and think I am being pretentious or cheesy.

Well, sometimes I can’t help myself but just write it still. But I do know I had reservations. 

I think it’s time to just write what I want to write and say what I have to say, and there’s no better time than now.

It’s like playing the piano or getting your practice done: there’s simply no better time than now.

Or anything else you want to do in life really.

There’s no time to waste or miss out on things you really want to do. Or even to have fun!

I love teaching, but I don’t love teaching people who don’t want to learn and practice (and keep saying it’s hard and there’s no time), who don’t want to do the heavy lifting but want the result straight away.

I love playing, but I don’t love playing music I don’t want to play, no matter how popular a song is to everyone in the world.

I love writing, and frankly I don’t really care if there’s a lot of people reading this (it turns out to be quite a lot of you do so THANK YOU!). But I certainly hope those who do would find this blog helpful in the past few years: I have certainly spent loads of time and effort maintaining this and hope it would reach out to more people because I genuinely think I have great resources here.

I love to mentor others, but I don’t love mentoring those who are lazy and don’t put their heart and soul in their teaching and their career, those who just want to do the minimum in the most ridiculously imprecise and inaccurate way and ask me for the reward thinking that’s the way to do things. I say no to that and them.

I love precision, dedication, and passion. And there’s no other way to live and do things. 

I love integrity. That’s the only way to be.

So there you go.

I hope you have a wonderful week ahead. Today is a brand new day for a brand new week! Enjoy!

Teresa Wong