Tag: 鋼琴導師訓練課程

How to teach piano beginners (I)

As piano students and performers, you all know the importance of piano lessons and practice, and how a great teacher can inspire you to the next new level. But as piano teachers, do you know what you have to do in order to be successful in teaching piano students?

In this series of articles , I’d like to share with you some useful ideas on how you as piano teachers to prepare yourselves on taking up this wonderful career of piano teaching.

Teaching piano beginners is a challenging task. Many might think it’s easier than teaching students of more intermediate levels. It’s crucial for piano teachers to nurture their beginner students carefully so that students start well on the merry way of music learning and enjoyment for many years to come.

The following tips are applicable for teaching piano beginners in general.

1. Use piano instruction books effectively

There are a lot of piano method books out there and many of them are quite excellent and fun. But not all of them are suitable for teaching purpose. Piano teachers should identify the books they find that are in line with their own teaching approach and choose wisely. More importantly, the piano method books out there do not teach teachers how to teach their books. So it’s up to the teachers to use the books accordingly. Even if the teachers are professionally trained musically, it doesn’t mean unfortunately that they are trained to teach music, and I know a lot of times they are frustrated with how to communicate in a way that students can understand and learn effectively.

This leads me to the second point..


2. Learn how to teach

I for a while did not understand the importance of learning how to teach. It was not until I took classes in piano pedagogy in graduate school and first-handedly received high-quality piano lessons from master piano teachers, that I understood the surprisingly distinct difference between the old-school mediocre piano teaching and the great piano teaching, which could immensely inspire a student to a great new level in piano playing and music understanding.

After finishing my master’s degree, I continued to learn and dig deeper in the subject of “teaching”. In piano teaching (or instrumental teaching for that matter), there are two main aspects one needs to learn as a teacher: teaching music and teaching in general. And in music teaching, there are piano playing (technique and repertoire) and music rudiments (theory, reading and aural ability, history). To be a successful and well-rounded piano teacher, one must not only acquire knowledge in music and piano but also learn how to teach.

Teaching is not to feed information into students’ brains- it’s rather to inform and guide the students, so that they are well-equipped with data they need to form their own judgment and apply their knowledge accordingly.

High-quality piano teaching does not have to be reserved to music students in prestige graduate schools only. As a matter of fact, children needs great teachers to learn from and be inspired by at early ages, right from the start of their music education journey.

3. Teach students how to practice

It’s important to teach students how to practice. A lot of teachers think the students automatically know that how to practice on their own, and hope that the parents would somehow take that responsibility to teach them or show them how. That cannot be more wrong.

First thing students should know is that practice is crucial for successful piano playing and repetition is important in their piano practice. And repetition does not mean playing a piece twice or the whole piece all the time. There should be guidance on how to practice and what to practice, what goals they set in each practice session and how to achieve those goals accordingly.

In our piano beginner books, we write out step-by-step instructions for students and parents to follow at home during their practice, so that they know what to do and what to pay attention to. In piano lessons, teachers should also spend time to explain to students how to practice certain phrases and what they themselves should pay attention to during their practice at home. Students need to know what they are looking for in their own practice and playing, instead of teachers pointing out their mistakes and them rectifying them afterwards. A lot of self-awareness and attention to details are required in students in their own practice (and playing) to make that practice session effective and productive.

When students know how to practice and what to look for during practice, it’s time to be creative in their practice. Teachers can demonstrate different ways of tackling a problem, whether it be a rhythmic, harmonic or coordination aspect. Teaching students to understand the components and make-up of a music piece would tremendously help them practice more effectively. No one gets far with practice or playing without understanding the musical content of a piece they are learning.

[:en]Piano Duet Concert[:zh]鋼琴二重奏音樂會[:]

[:en]Our piano duet concert, “80 Minutes Around the World”, will be held on October 16, 2016 (Sunday) at 730pm, at the Recital Hall 8/F of Hong Kong City Hall. This is a very fun and creative piano concert, and we would love to see you there![:zh]我們的鋼琴二重奏 「80分鐘環遊世界」音樂會 將於2016年10月16日(星期日)晚上七時半 ,在香港大會堂演奏廳8樓高座舉行。這是一個非常有趣和富有創意的鋼琴音樂會,我們希望能看到您的光臨![:]

[:zh]貪心是可以的!如果你肯付出的話。[:]

[:zh]你想五年考八級? 兩年考文憑級? 考試有140 分? 比賽蠃第一?
得!

貪心是可以的!如果你肯付出的話。

[:]

How to Use the Piano Pedal (II)

 

Often students ask me how to use pedal(s) in a piece they are working on. To that I am quite surprised at first, but I understand where they are coming from. They were never taught about the real application of pedaling – just as they were never taught anything about piano technique.

Let’s focus on the right pedal, the so-called “loud” pedal. It’s the sustaining pedal which maintains the resonance of fuller sound produced by keeping the whole set of dampers lifted off the strings when being kept down.

First of all, we rarely step to the very bottom of the sustaining pedal. More often than not, we step half way or at most 3/4 way down of the depth of the pedal. What does that mean? 

Watch the video here (it’s in Cantonese for now, will make one in English soonest!)

Imagine you are driving. Once you start the car, you step on the gas pedal, you never really step all the way down because that would be you are going on a fast-and-furious speed you cannot control! It’s just the same as using a pedal at the piano. 

In the same theory, you never release the pedal all the way up too, just as you never fully release the gas pedal in order to keep the car going. At the piano, when you have to change the pedaling, you always release until just a bit of leeway before you feel you fully release the whole pedal all the way up. That means you still feel some pressure holding just a little bit of the pedal down.  You would of course however release the whole pedal all the way up when you have finished the whole pedaling process, or you are playing the next passage or chord that does not require pedaling, or the chords (e.g. Staccato  notes or short block chords) that require very clean separate sound instead of very legato and lyrical one. 

Other than pressing the sustaining pedal most of the way down, you can also press half way down, a third or a fourth of the way down, or something we called flutter pedal, which means you only press very little of the pedal and change it very quickly to keep very very clean yet connected sound with more resonance than otherwise. 

In the next post, I shall talk about when (the timing) to apply the sustaining pedal. 

[:en]On becoming a great teacher [:zh]On becoming a great teacher [:]

[:en]On becoming a great teacher [:]