Tag: piano lessons

Five Steps to Effective Piano Practice

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Classical music: sacred or scary?

People have a general misconception about classical music. 

“It’s boring.”

“It’s for the elite.” (“high-class”).

“It’s old. Who wants to listen to that?”

“I don’t understand it.”

“I don’t play an instrument, so I don’t get it.”

Classical music is just another music genre, like jazz, hip hop, rock, pop, world. 

Of course, in the hearts of “classical people” – meaning the classical musicians and connoisseurs, classical music is “unique”, “pristine”, even “sacred”, like the untouchable.

I like to think there is something special with classical music of course, with my own background of years of classical music training and study. Even I like many kinds of music, classical music does have a special place in my heart, there’s no doubt about it. But I also like to share with people who are interested in learning and listening to it more, because there’s nothing “scary” or “boring” about classical music at all. In fact, once you get a hang of it, you would start to be able to appreciate it more and bathe and rejoice in the beauty of it, that I can assure you of.

Now, where do we start?

Let’s start from singing.

Who doesn’t like to sing? Who can’t appreciate a good singing voice, even one thinks they cannot sing?

I enjoy listening to vocal music, be it solo or choral. I am quite inclined to listening to choral music though -perhaps due to my training as a choral conductor – from a cappella to chorus with a full on orchestra. My favorite choral music would be gregorian chant and mass, then followed by some beautifully harmonised “modern”choral songs.

Now how do you listen to the music here?

  1. listen with your mind open – forget about what kind of music it is. Just listen and feel. And ask yourself, “do we like it? why?”
  2. find out more about the music – google it, who wrote it? who sang it? is there any story to the music/about the composer – there’s always some story, at least if there’s lyrics, you can appreciate the words.
  3. if you know how to play an instrument and understand some music theory, then you can find out some basic structural information about the piece. Or simply, listen to the ebbs and flows of the music. Or, if there’s more than one instrument, can you hear what’s there? How do the different instrumentation come together, and how do they interact with each other?

So here are some of my favorite, please enjoy:

First, some good old fashioned piano solo music, everyone’s favorite! : s famous nocturnes by Chopin:

Now, some choral music with piano accompaniment, some more harmonized, easy listening and “modern”:

And here is some unaccompanied (“a cappella”) mass, it’s for me very healing and almost spiritual experience listening to this kind of music:

If anyone wants me to talk about these genres, like the background and things like that, I am happy to write about them in the future. Just send me a message and let me know!

Much blessings in music,

Teresa x

Enjoy your piano playing

You know, sometimes when I write, I get really worked up.

You know why? Because I care.

I care about how people teach, and how people learn.

Because I had “teachers” who screwed me up, never taught me anything, implied that I was bad at playing, trashed my confidence, without a care. And I vowed to myself I never would do that to my students, or hir any teachers who would do that to their students.

But I also had some wonderful Teachers who are great at what they do, who are good at their craft not only in playing but also more importantly in teaching. Those are great human beings who have inspired me to do the same for my students, every single day I teach and run my piano school.

So yes I might sound mean sometimes in my post, I am very straightforward and blunt about how I think and feel. And I think my readers would appreciate my honesty here.

Now, back to the main topic (which I always get derailed from for five paragraphs right from the start).

So, I want our students to enjoy playing the piano, and I also want you, my readers, who might not be our students (per se), to enjoy learning music and playing the piano. Why?

Because playing the piano is not a torture. It’s not a punishment. And for sure it’s not boring.

Certainly, it’s HARD sometimes. And sometimes it feels like HELL when you can’t get this one passage or a scale or a sight-reading exercise (gasp!! just think about that emoji that looks like “The Scream” by Edvard Munch) right. That can be a pain for a while. But that’s called struggle, and that’s how we learn and progress after we have managed that struggle.

So, I hope you have learnt something from me so far in the past seven and a half years on this blog – I know it’s hard to find it now as it’s sort of embedded in this complicated website of mine/my school. Anyone find it hard to find my articles on this site please let me know, I might separate this blog back to stand on its own if that helps. What I want to do here is to help you get better and enjoy more in your music/piano journey.

And forgive me if I have not been perfect – because I never said so. I might have made mistakes here and there and didn’t write all so eloquently at times because I was mad/confused/hurt/pained/wronged or whatever, but my intentions will always stay true.

Much blessings to all of you and happy playing,
TW

P.S. Hey, I have a new scales video (series) coming out, check out the first one here!

Keep Going and Keep Playing!



Dear Students,


Some of you might be feeling down and having a little rough time lately. Honestly, me too. Sometimes I also feel I cannot do this. I feel exhausted and lost, and that I cannot continue to do what I have been working on. But when I think about you, when I get messages from all over the world asking for help and guidance, when there are new students keep coming to me, and existing students reminding me of my good work, I know I am doing the right thing all along and I must keep going. So, I also ask you to do this for me. Please keep going.


Believe in your own ability and the work you have been doing. When you look back last year or a couple years, what do you see? Do you see that you have come far along from where you were? I sure do, for myself and you as well. (If you have not, you should really face yourself and ask yourself why.) I see I have walked and progressed far from where I was last year. And let me tell you this: I did not know I would come to this point last year, when I was confused with what I had to do! So do not waste your time in tormenting yourself, blaming yourself with what you have not done or achieved. Instead, put your precious time and effort to persist and work harder. Focus on how to sound better, improve each movement in a more precise manner and project each note with a more refined tone quality. Above all, open up your mind, your (inner) ears, your (inner) eyes, your body and your soul to accept the new sound, the new possibility to achieve what the next new height, which as a matter of course is unknown to both you and me, because you have not reached there yet! But with hard work and perseverance, we can do this together. Only if you want it. Only if you truly want it.

Now go get some practice done, whether at the piano, at the computer (listening), the book/score (reading /analyzing), your mind (thinking/changing the way you think) or your heart (believing/changing the way you believe in yourself/this thing called the purpose of playing the piano).


You are much better than you think you are. You can do much more than you think you can.


Your Teacher,

Teresa Wong


My student Douglas and Me
My student Douglas and Me