Category: Teaching Notes

Honoring Music Teaching

Teaching is a service to others.

Teachers are the guides, to shed light for their students on the path of knowledge and learning, with wisdom, insight, compassion, patience and empathy.

Teachers pass their knowledge, skills and information, their ways of learning and problem solving to their disciples, so that they can adapt, modify and create their own principles and methods to apply wisely for their own learning and skills. It’s the kind of flexible and smart principle that helps one to apply in different situations accordingly, instead of a cookie cutter, one size fit all rigid method that can be used in only one fixed situation.

I have the privilege to have learnt from great masters and teachers, and the pleasure to have passed my knowledge to my wonderful students of many over the past two decades. I am also grateful to have this platform to share it with you my readers here. I hope you have all learnt something useful and impactful, something that lasts and is applicable in many ways, which would be the definition of true knowledge.

As for the aspiring music teachers, I hope you have mustered all your courage, your passion as well as your patience, when you are just starting out and at times feeling frustrated, exhausted and simply, lost. Keep up with your great work, keep on with your love for music and teaching, I’m here to support you.

How to Build a Successful Music Teaching Studio Course Special Discount

How to set up your own music teaching studio: Define your priority in teaching

In this video I talk about how to set up your own music teaching studio by discussing the most important thing first: Define your priority in teaching.

How to build a successful music/piano teaching studio?

A lot of readers asked me this question. I get it, it’s hard to promote yourself. It’s even embarrassing, because we are musicians/pianists, we are artists, we are not for sale. But hey, don’t think about it in that way. If you want people to know you, you have to get out there and literally tell people that YOU EXIST. So here are a few pointers as to how to promote yourself in order to build a successful and thriving music studio of yours:

1. Start a blog

Share with your existing and potential students what you’ve got: what you know about music, piano and teaching. Just write something short and simple at the beginning  few lines every day, about what you’ve learnt and taught in lessons or some tips on practice and playing. Eventually you can write more and add more substance in your posts. 

2. Record videos

Record videos of your students playing in lessons or even your own playing. Teach people some basic music theories, like how to read or identify chords. 

3. Write something about yourself

Write about your educational qualifications, your experience in performance and teaching. Tell people about your teaching philosophy and style: it’s important for your potential students (and especially their parents) to know about your personally. 

4. Share your experience

People want to connect with those whom they feel familiar with. If you share your experience with your readers, they already feel like they know you before they’ve even met you-and I know that from my personal experience. Be authentic and genuine. 

Learn more from the podcasts below:

Some personal sharing and thank you to you all!

I’d like to thank all of you for your support in the past years and share with you about my journey to get here. I also want to encourage everyone of you, keep going and be confident of your own ability! You can do it too!

enjoy your piano playing

Enjoy Your Piano Playing

You know, sometimes when I write, I get really worked up.

You know why? Because I care.

I care about how people teach, and how people learn.

Because I had “teachers” who were mean to me, did not teach with enough knowledge, implied that I was bad at playing, trashed my confidence, without a care. And I vowed to myself I never would do that to my students, or hire any teachers who would do that to their students.

But I also had some wonderful Teachers who are great at what they do, who are good at their craft not only in playing, but also more importantly in teaching. Those are great human beings who have inspired me to do the same for my students, every single day.

So yes, sometimes I might sound very straightforward and blunt about how I think and feel in my posts, but I think my readers would appreciate my honesty here.

I like our students to enjoy playing the piano, and I also like you, my readers, who might not be our students (per se), to enjoy learning music and playing the piano. Why?

Because playing the piano is not a torture. It’s not a punishment. And for sure it’s not boring.

Certainly, it’s HARD sometimes. And sometimes it feels horrible when you can’t get this one passage or a scale or a sight-reading exercise (gasp!! just think about that emoji that looks like “The Scream” by Edvard Munch) right. That can be painful for a while. But that’s called struggle, and that’s how we learn and progress after we have managed that struggle.

I hope you have learnt something from me on this blog  – what I want to do here is to help you get better and enjoy more in your piano journey.

No matter where you are at in this music journey – time, level, effort- remember, this is YOUR journey. It’s personal, and it should be enjoyable.

Much blessings to all of you and happy playing,

TW

P.S. Hey, I have a new scales video (series) coming out, check out the first one here!

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